Resources

River Beavers: No Dams Required

To dam or not to dam? The beavers in the incredible camera trap photographs below, from William MacFarland, live on the Anacostia River which flows from Maryland into Washington DC. They build lodges to live in but have no need for dams. Beavers build dams to create water that is deep enough (ideally 3 feet…

How to Protect Trees from Beaver Chewing

Tree-wrapping materials list heavy gauge welded wire fencing, 4ft tall, 2x4in spacing wire cutters work gloves pliers landscape stakes/staples/pins measuring tape zip ties Happy wrapping!

A Year in the Life of a Beaver

Ever wonder what beavers are up to during each of the four seasons? When we understand beaver life history and how their behaviors change throughout the year, we are more likely to coexist with them successfully!

Beavers Myths Busted

Beavers do not eat fish. Beavers are strictly herbivores, but they don’t eat only trees either! As ‘choosy generalists,’ their diet consists of many species (80+) of woody, herbaceous, and aquatic plants. Most people blame author C. S. Lewis for the common misunderstanding about beaver diet, as he wrote in The Chronicles of Narnia that they eat fish.…

Common Tree-Wrapping Mistakes

Protecting individual trees from beaver chewing is a cheap, long-lasting, nonlethal, and effective coexistence strategy when done correctly. Avoid these common mistakes so you don’t duplicate effort or waste money on the wrong materials: Inappropriate fencing material– Beavers can chew through chicken wire (pictured below) and other flimsy metal or plastic mesh. We recommend heavy…

Do I REALLY Have a Beaver Problem?

Sometimes people discover chewed or felled trees, realize there are beavers living on their land, and assume there is a problem when there may not be. Just because you have beavers on your property doesn’t mean there is a conflict! Remember that beavers are adapted to make changes to their environment, and that beavers or…

Tree Protection Mini Workshop & Volunteer Day

12/21/2021 Human-Beaver Coexistence Fund (HBCF) partnered with the Potomac Valley Audubon Society (PVAS) for an educational and productive volunteer afternoon to protect priority trees at Cool Spring Preserve from being felled by beavers. HBCF founder and former PVAS AmeriCorps volunteer, Alison Zak, taught participants how to coexist with beavers by wrapping trees to protect them from…

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